Migrating Nintex Workflow Content to Another DB

Here lately I’ve been looking into doing some cleanup for Nintex related databases in a SharePoint farm, so I thought I would share a short write up I did for a few other folks on the process of moving content in the context of dealing with Nintex content databases.

Taken from : https://community.nintex.com/docs/DOC-1092

First take backups of Nintex and content databases involved

Go to central admin under the Nintex workflow section and pick the databases option.

From here scroll down and check your DB mappings to make sure you know which DB’s will be involved in these changes

Next go back to the Nintex Databases section and create a new blank Nintex DB to use for migration (name ie. Nintex_Content_SiteName)

If you are moving SharePoint content as well, go into Central admin under Manage Content Databases and create a new one there, or you can use PowerShell to create the new SharePoint Content DB and attach it to the farm.

The SharePoint content can be migrated by normal backup-spsite and restore-spsite methods specifying the new Content DB created to make sure the SharePoint info goes to the new DB.

Or this can be done using the Move-SPSite command through PowerShell as well with an IIS RESET as the last step.

Now to migrate the Nintex Workflow info you will need to do a few more steps:

  1. Stop the web app that contains the Nintex info being moved
  2. Also stop the SharePoint Timer Service on ALL SharePoint servers in the farm so no actions take place in the background during the move.
  3. Run the nwadmin -o movedata command to migrate the content to the new Nintex DB
    1. Example like: nwadmin -o moveData -Url http://webapplication.caresource.corp/sites/sitename
  4. Once this command executes you may see errors or other info about the moved workflows. If there are failures you may want to choose the option to roll back the changes.
  5. Once the command finishes successfully, restart the SharePoint Timer Service and the web application in IIS in order to get everything working correctly again.
  6. Recheck database mappings in central admin to make sure the items are in the newly created database
  7. May also want to run NWAdmin.exe -o CleanTaskRedirects [-test]
  8. Specify the old nintex DB to see if there are any leftover workflows for lazy approvals.
  9. If not, then remove [-test] from the previous command and it should remove any other info to clear out the old Nintex DB

Again, check your mappings in Central Admin to make sure everything is now separated as it should be and good to go

I hope this helps for anyone that has to go through this process in the future. I’m still learning alot about it myself, so once I’ve had plenty of practice, I may post an updated article as well.

Thanks everyone! -BJ

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Office Files too big? Inspect them!

Today I had a problem with a group of users that were trying to work with a very large PowerPoint file in SharePoint and didn’t realize until I downloaded a local copy of the file that it was too big to work with through Office Web Apps.

So I did some digging around to see if there was a way to possibly shrink the files, so I ended up finding something here:

https://support.office.com/en-us/article/remove-hidden-data-and-personal-information-by-inspecting-documents-presentations-or-workbooks-356b7b5d-77af-44fe-a07f-9aa4d085966f

In PowerPoint 2016 you can find the option here:

After doing a bit more digging, this actually applies to all Word, Excel, and PowerPoint versions from 2016 on down to even the Office 2010 versions.

So now I’d be curious if this could be automated somehow to do some major cleanup in PowerShell or something? Hmmm… maybe for another blog post later… hehehe.

Hope this helps if you need to free up some space in the future.

Enjoy!

Keep your VM’s neat and tidy

If you are like me, you tend to create Virtual Machines (VM’s) every so often to test different scenarios. And if you are also like me you are constantly running into and complaining that you have no free storage space on any drives internal or external to create more VM’s to do more testing with. What can I say? Nature abhors a vacuum.

So today I want to make you aware of a couple of things that I like to do for monthly maintenance items when using personal VM’s.

First, I like to go into the VM itself and run storage cleanup on the drive itself to get rid of things like windows updates, temp storage, and cached items from other sources that just take up unnecessary room on the OS drive in my VM.

Usually this starts by right clicking on the OS drive itself and choosing “Disk Cleanup”.

Hardware 
local Disk 
file system NTFS 
used space 
Free space 
Cap acity 
126.195.417.088bytes 
385.388.032.OOObytes 
511.583.449.088bytes 
Chive C 
Shanng 
117G8 
358 Gd 
476 Gd 
Disk Cleanup

The above image came from a Windows 10 box, but your mileage may vary and most windows servers and client machines have a similar setting.

On certain servers however, you may have to go in and activate the “Desktop Experience” feature in order to have this button show.

Here’s a link to TechNet for Windows Server 2012 as an example.

So now you may have freed up some valuable space on your VM, but did you know if you use VMWare there is another setting that can be just as beneficial?

If you use VMWare Workstation there is a setting under the VM menu, located under the manage section called “Clean Up Disks…” and this can be just as beneficial at freeing up more space. Find this option after highlighting a VM in your list of VM’s.

Choosing this option will open another window that will look like this:

Disk Cleanup 
Disk cleanup can redaim disk space thatisallocated to virtual disk files but 
that the guest OS no longer uses. 
Disk space used by this virtual machine: 80.8 GE 
O Reclaimable space: 4.7 GE 
Clean up novv

By selecting the “Clean up now” option this will give back space to your drive that you can now use to create more and more lovely Virtual Machines to test more and more scenarios with.

I’m not sure if Virtual Box or Hyper-V have a similar setting, but hopefully they do. That may be another post down the road…

Hopefully this helps with any spring cleaning you might do, but it’s definitely one thing to revisit if you are actively testing scenarios locally or in a big virtual environment.

Enjoy!

-BJ